Jennie Bedusa

Video
Nominated for an Oscar® in the Live Action Short Film category, The Letter Room follows an empathetic corrections officer (Oscar Isaac) who finds escape in the deeply personal letters written to an inmate on death row. Co-starring Alia Shawkat.
Read More
Video
On stage he makes crowds laugh with his hilariously biting musings. Off stage, comedian Gastor Almonte talks about how his comedy is rooted in his immigrant roots, parenthood, and his beloved neighborhood of East New York.
Read More
Series
New Orleans lore collides with dark magic in this horror anthology series. Created by Coodie & Chike and starring Chad Coleman, PJ Morton and Omar Dorsey, these “Twilight Zone”-style tales expose chilling corners of the Big Easy.
Read More
Series
To us they’re mundane objects, but to them they’re priceless. House on Fire asks individuals to save one thing if their house were ablaze. The items they choose tell entire stories about culture, identity, and the true value of material possessions.
Read More
Video
Heather Havrilesky is a successful author, essayist and humorist best known for her advice column “Ask Polly." In this episode, she tells us why she’d choose to save her childhood teddy bear (and self-described “ally”) if her house was burning down.
Read More
Video
Woodburn, OR is an agricultural town with a large Latinx population. In this episode, residents choose items that tell their immigrant stories and seemingly banal objects that they can’t live without.
Read More
Video
Cascade Locks, OR is a scenic town that was narrowly saved from a forest fire in 2017. This episode explores how almost losing everything changes one’s relationship to property and possessions.
Read More
Video
Happy Valley, OR is a storybook upper middle-class suburb known for being safe. Here residents reflect on the importance of maintaining that sense of safety through their material possessions.
Read More
Video
Dignity Village and Kenton Women's Village, OR are self-run communities for previously homeless people. Being homeless has given some residents a uniquely profound perspective on material possessions.
Read More
Video
Few hobbies require the technical skills of railway enthusiasts. Get to know the niche world of Garden Rail Magazine and its impassioned community, who find focus, therapy, and camaraderie in the hobby of running large-scale trains outdoors.
Read More
Video
The devastating power of tornadoes is undeniable, but have you ever wondered why the Bible Belt and Tornado Alley overlap? Meet survivors, meteorologists, and everyday people whose experiences with tornadoes have confirmed their belief in the Divine.
Read More
Video
A lyrical portrait of a devout Amish woodworker who begins to question his faith. When Kenneth is excommunicated from his insular community, he must find a new purpose in life without God.
Read More
Series
What happens to a property after it’s been marred by tragedy? Can it be revived or will it be forever stigmatized? “Distressed real estate” expert Randall Bell shows us what has become of four infamous sites around the US steeped in trauma.
Read More
Series
In these documentary portraits inspired by Racquet Magazine, Darius Clarke Monroe examines the role of racquet sports in American culture and sheds light on the unexpected communities, obsessions, and passions built around tennis and handball.
Read More
Video
When Mark Kuhn decided to build a homemade tennis court, he never imagined it would become popular or take on such profound significance. The All Iowa Lawn Tennis Club started out as a family project and grew into a beloved public court for his community. But after his family experienced an unthinkable tragedy, it became a very private outlet for healing. Today, it remains a fitting memorial that still conjures many happy memories for Mark.
Read More
Video
Built by and for its community, the Maravilla handball courts in East LA have provided an outlet for healthy exercise for almost a century. But they’re so much more than just an athletic space. Amanda Perez gives us a history lesson on the courts, which span back to 1928 and have come to represent the neighborhood’s rich Chicano heritage. Since then, multiple generations have upheld the historic landmark as a sacred site where people can be themselves.
Read More
Video
He was crazy about tennis, she was drawn to his passion. Together, they built a life running the South Oxford Tennis Club in Brooklyn from 1981 to 1997. Now Richard and Ann Northern are sharing their favorite memories from those days, from his Tennis Hotline show, to building the courts with their own hands, to having their own wedding at the club, which kicked off a decade and a half of love, labor, and rackets.
Read More
Video
This intimate portrait of a tennis instructor is like a meditation on finding strength and peace through the ritual that is bringing ball to racket. She’s tough as nails when she’s training her students, but in her personal life, she’s grieving her mother’s health and old age. The only thing that recenters her is practicing her serve. When she’s on the court, she finds her breath again and transforms into the formidable athlete and instructor that most people see.
Read More
Series
Get a glimpse at the future of health and rehab through five individuals testing out groundbreaking new technology and programs. Judging by their stories, the future is bright.
Read More
Series
An intimate look at four rising musicians from Chicago and the common issues that young Black women artists have to overcome both in a male-dominated music industry and a marginalizing society, from racism to physical expectations to sexual trauma.
Read More
Series
Seven billion people. One act. Infinite ways to do it. Everybody eats, but that’s where the similarities end. With the power to influence cultures, industries, and personal ambitions, eating is a direct entry point into understanding humanity
Read More
Video
Jollof rice is a widely celebrated staple dish in both Nigeria and Ghana, but who does it better? In this seriously heated cook-off, Chef Segun of Nigeria and Chef Barbara of Ghana will each make a convincing case for their country’s version.
Read More
Video
Sisterhood is more than skin deep. Half-sisters Jazmin and Timeisha are both proud to be Black, but having different skin tones means being impacted by prejudice in different ways. But they share one identical trait: they’ve got each other’s backs.
Read More
Video
A great way to earn money or a pyramid scheme? Both Carly and Roberta sold clothes for controversial MLM (multi-level marketing) company LulaRoe, but see why one calls it a healthy outlet and one became an anti-MLM advocate.
Read More
Video
He lost nothing and fled. She lost everything and stayed. After surviving the 2018 Woolsey fire, record exec Damon Dash and lifelong Malibu resident LisaJo McGee developed very differing views on the value of home.
Read More
Video
With a sound that’s like Erykah Badu meets Little Dragon and an eclectic style, Jean Deaux is poised for breakout success. She revisits her first open mic stages, opens up about a trauma, and reveals how she resists fear.
Read More
Video
Akenya, 26, is a quadruple threat: singer, pianist, composer, and arranger. After overcoming a lonely childhood, health issues, and every form of marginalization, she’s now working with Grammy-nominated artists and ready to release her own album.
Read More
Video
At 22, singer Christian has already won the respect of Chance the Rapper, but it hasn’t been an easy road. On the South Side, she dealt with redlining; in Freeport, she faced open racism. Now the preacher’s daughter is taking on the music industry.
Read More
Video
Shortly after releasing her mixtape, “RETROGRADE,” rapper, teacher, and tarot card reader Jasmine (aka J Bambii) talks about the roots of her anxieties and how music has helped her heal and learn to accept herself.
Read More
Video
In 2007, a gunman killed 32 people at Virginia Tech. The majority of them were in Norris Hall. Today, the building has been transformed into a center for peace studies, which Randall Bell calls a “textbook” way to revive a tragedy site.
Read More
Video
The mere mention of Jeffrey Dahmer’s name sends chills, so imagine being his neighbors. In this case, the stigma was so strong that the building had to be destroyed. But according to Randall, that should have been just the beginning.
Read More
Video
The Flight 93 memorial site turned a common field into a national landmark, but not before the landowner demanded a hefty sum for the property increase. Was he profiting off of tragedy or just fighting for fair compensation? Randall Bell explores.
Read More
Video
Occupying the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the National Civil Rights Museum honors his legacy by continuing his work. But it’s more than a memorial; it’s a catalyst for ongoing change.
Read More
Video
Technology is enabling paralyzed individuals to have more options than ever. Sergio, a quadriplegic, trades his mouthstick for an app that allows him to paint using simple facial movements.
Read More
Video
The era of relying on opioids is over. Virtual reality technology is enabling individuals with injury-induced paralysis like Woody to reduce chronic pain through simulating movements with VR limbs.
Read More
Video
Technology is enabling paralyzed individuals to have more options than ever. Sergio, a quadriplegic, trades his mouthstick for an app that allows him to paint using simple facial movements.
Read More
Video
Like many seniors in the US, Betsy has chronic health issues but not the finances to treat them, until she found TIPS (Telehealth Intervention Program for Seniors). Now she has help, and a new family.
Read More
Video
After an accident left him wheelchair-bound, Robert turned his life around with the help of ReWalk, a cutting-edge robotic exoskeleton. A revealing look at how much our bodies rely on walking.
Read More
Video
Birders aren’t the only folks with expensive lenses and their heads angled upwards. In this very special episode, Jason heads to California to meet another group of flight obsessives: the plane spotters and aviation photographers of LAX.
Read More
Video
It had to be a peregrine falcon. In this episode, Jason visits a tattoo shop in Forest Park, Georgia, for his first experience getting inked. As he goes under the needle for a beautiful rendering of his favorite bird, Jason opens up about one of most difficult periods of his life.
Read More
Video
Jason meets up with celebrated novelist and passionate birder Jonathan Franzen in Chicago, where they spot one of North America's rarest songbirds and discuss how Franzen’s impressive personal bird count (around 4,600 species!) influenced his views on climate change.
Read More
Video
Jason meets the keen-eyed members of the Ohio Young Birders Club—one of the first youth birding groups in the country—and finds out what it’s like to be a teenage bird nerd.
Read More
Video
Jason visits New York’s AMNH, where collections manager Paul Sweet gives him a special, behind-the-scenes look at one of the largest avian assortments in the world, which includes specimens of the extinct passenger pigeon, as well as parrots, owls, and Jason’s favorites, peregrine falcons.
Read More
Video
Jason’s younger brother, Jeffrey, is also a birder, and when they head to Central Park together, their competitive instincts get triggered. In the midst of spotting turkey vultures and cedar waxwings, the duo discuss their “spark” birds and compare notes on what it’s really like to bird while black.
Read More
Video
Jason delivers a beginner’s course in using a birder’s most important tool.
Read More
Video
In this premiere episode, Bronx native and bird-lover Jason Ward visits Central Park—“the best place in North America to see migrating birds”—where he joins thousands of warblers and compares the unique sound of a rose-breasted grosbeak to the squeak of rubber soles on a basketball court.
Read More
Video
Jason takes a visit to the Wild Bird Fund, an organization that works to rehabilitate thousands of injured birds every year, where he meets a Common Loon, an American Kestrel and accompanies a WBF staffer on a trip to release a group of pigeons back into the wilds of New York City.
Read More
Video
What do house sparrows and predatory NYC real estate developers have in common? In this episode, acclaimed actress and Brooklyn resident Lili Taylor and Jason talk birding, acting and defense of one’s home turf.
Read More
Video
He’s from the East Coast. They’re from the West Coast. In this episode, Jason teams up with two Audubon colleagues from the LA area for an excursion outside the city and frank conversations about their experiences of birding while brown.
Read More
Video
Migration isn’t for the faint of heart. In Cape May, New Jersey, Jason witnesses songbirds battling howling winds, meets a team of migration researchers who outfit birds with high-tech GPS trackers, and gets up close and personal with the highly secretive yellow-billed cuckoo.
Read More
Video
So. Many. Birds. Jason throws himself into the joyful mayhem of New Jersey Audubon’s Fall Festival at the Cape May Bird Observatory, where he meets birding legend Pete Dunne and a married couple who moved into a van to become full-time, mobile birders.
Read More